Posted even better time

Slogging up the side of San Jacinto did have an immediate impact. I was able to get my standard tire towing route under 28 minutes. That’s a first! I was able to push much harder and feel my muscles strain to pull but I didn’t flame out like I would have last month.
There’s still the balance to be had of keeping injury-free while improving in performance every time.

Tyre training modification

After half-wasting another chain into metal dust, I carved a hole in the old tire with a 1/2″ drill bit. After a couple of cuts, I was able to punch through a link to the outside of the tire. Now I can either use the tire in difficult or less difficult mode.

To make the change between modes, I flip the chain around from being mounted high on the tread or low. If low, life is easier because I’m lifting up on the tire when dragging. For difficult, the tire is pulled straight if not slightly down, dramatically increasing the pulling force required to move the tire.

30 minute tire drag.  I’ve also begun logging my training in an Excel worksheet, as I have yet to find a good WordPress widget to track workouts with.

Tyre dragging vs the chain

After tearing through 3/16 chain in a half hour, I decided I needed to step it up with a

Ground through heavy chain

much heavier chain.  For this 40 minute session, I dropped by Home Depot this morning and purchased some beefy chain.

As I’ve seen others use chains to drag their tires (tyres for you Brits), I went with that.  This time I got some good, heavy chain in hopes that physics would somehow make the chain last much longer.

I was wrong. Continue reading “Tyre dragging vs the chain”

Breaking the chain

When purchasing a chain to drag a tire along the road, the first concern is to make sure the chain is long enough to wrap around the tire.  Virtually any classic chain will do.  At least I thought.

Chain ground down after one session

I wanted to make sure I didn’t have one of those weird twisted chains used on kids swing sets.  Those things aren’t really good for anything.  And the chain that can hold a 1,000 pounds is way overkill.  So there’s no reason to purchase a heavy-duty chain because there’s no way I’m going to pull 280 pounds of load.

That may be true, but.

Maybe I need thicker chain.  I’ll try that and see if the physics of the universe changes and the chain survives.  At least I know that if I’m chained to something, I can drag it for a half hour to cut it.  The chain does get blasting hot, too.