Avoid death in the mountains using this crampon sharpening technique

When climbing snowy mountains, sharp crampons and a reliable ice axe are the difference between life and death. A climber died on Tweeinot in 2018 because he wasn’t wearing his crampons even though he carried them. Apparently, he didn’t have an ice axe…

When climbing snowy mountains, sharp crampons and a reliable ice axe are the difference between life and death. A climber died on Tweeinot in 2018 because he wasn’t wearing his crampons even though he carried them. Apparently, he didn’t have an ice axe, either.

This video shows you how to sharpen your crampons easily and quickly.

Check out the video and see what you think. Enjoy the World Beyond experience. Thank you for watching and please support & subscribe!

 

 

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About Aaron Linsdau

Aaron Linsdau is a polar explorer and motivational speaker. He is the second only American to ski alone from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole, setting a world record for surviving the longest expedition ever for that trip. Aaron is an Amazon best-selling author, is an expert at overcoming adversity and minimizing risk, and loves improving the lives of others.

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Where can you practice defying death in Jackson Hole?

Teton Boulder Park is the perfect place to practice death-defying skills in relative safety. Located at the base of Snow King mountain, this completely free and open rock climbing park is available for anyone. The town’s Parks and Recreation Department…

Teton Boulder Park is the perfect place to practice death-defying skills in relative safety. Located at the base of Snow King mountain, this completely free and open rock climbing park is available for anyone. The town’s Parks and Recreation Department supports a weekly Town Pump climbing competition during the summer.

This park is the perfect place to unleash the kids while you take a break. You can try your climbing skills on easy challenges. There are tough routes that Aaron has yet to figure out, too.

There’s even a slackline set up for people to try their tightrope walking skills.

 

Check out the video and see what you think. Enjoy the World Beyond experience. Thank you for watching and please subscribe!

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How to make big progress slowly

How do you conquer climbing a mountain or completing a huge project? What’s the best way to go about it? People, including me, like to rush at the last second, taking the heroic approach. But is that the best way to go? In my experience—definitel…

How do you conquer climbing a mountain or completing a huge project? What’s the best way to go about it? People, including me, like to rush at the last second, taking the heroic approach. But is that the best way to go? In my experience—definitely not.

When you try to rush, work through the night, and crank it out, it may seem like you succeeded. That’s not possible to keep up all the time, though. I used to work at places where we did the hero thing, multiple times a quarter. After a while, people started quitting and developing health problems. It was a consistency failure.

The same thing happens when you work out and train for something. It’s much more effective to apply consistent, slow but manageable work. It’s not as glamorous but it’ll get you to the top of the mountain. In this video, I climbed Mt. Glory to 10,130′ and didn’t break a sweat because I went slowly. It wasn’t glorious but I got the job done.

You can too!

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Towing in hail and lightning

Towing in hail and lightning was a good physical and mental exercise for the challenges I’m going to face down south.  I wasn’t too worried about the lightning, as I didn’t see any cloud to ground strikes.  However, with clouds just overhead, that can change in an instant.

 

I hid under a tree on the side of the road for a moment to grab my iPhone to get this little video clip when my boots almost took a little swim.  The heavier rain and hail above me on the hill began channeling down the side of the road, creating a mini-flash flood.  Nothing too severe, just something to get my footwear muddy.

When you spend time in the desert and you see storm clouds over the far-away mountains, you always keep watch because that moving water can come up on you in an instant.  This looked just like something out of the desert, minus the hail.

2 tire distance

Traveling 0.6 miles in 3.5 hours is a lesson in humility and knowing when to call it.

2 tires up Old Teton Pass Road
2 tires up Old Teton Pass Road

Towing 2 tires up Old Teton Pass Road afforded me just that opportunity.

It is about 1 mile from the trail head parking lot to Crater Lake.  After a massive amount of effort and laughingly getting nowhere, I ended up at the mark on the map.

Crater Lake
Crater Lake

I actually had a really good time attempting the near impossible.  It was entertaining to try something I quickly figured out was not going to work.  And that was okay.  Finding out what it will be like when I hit impossible conditions was important.  Learning how my mind and body respond to such things will help me when I’m out on the Antarctic plateau.  Better to figure it out now than when I’m alone out there.

 

Once I realized and accepted that I was going to cover no ground for the day, I was very content with what I was going to accomplish.  At times, taking 6+ minutes to cover 100 yards was frustrating.  And then, after examining the load, it all made sense and the worry went away.

Roasting in the heat

We could really do with a little less heat here.  It’s supposed to get to 90 degrees this afternoon:

Now (3:39PM MST) from Wunderground.com
Scattered Clouds
Scattered Clouds
Temperature
88 °F
Feels Like 84 °F

For the last half mile of towing today, I had to start and stop because the sun was beating down so hard.  I even ended up with a tan line from the trekking pole straps.  That was pretty funny, considering I put on SPF 50 sunscreen.

Tyre training modification

After half-wasting another chain into metal dust, I carved a hole in the old tire with a 1/2″ drill bit. After a couple of cuts, I was able to punch through a link to the outside of the tire. Now I can either use the tire in difficult or less difficult mode.

To make the change between modes, I flip the chain around from being mounted high on the tread or low. If low, life is easier because I’m lifting up on the tire when dragging. For difficult, the tire is pulled straight if not slightly down, dramatically increasing the pulling force required to move the tire.

30 minute tire drag.  I’ve also begun logging my training in an Excel worksheet, as I have yet to find a good WordPress widget to track workouts with.